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Enjoyability:       smile transpsmile transpsmile transpsmile transp graysmile transp gray

Deep Thoughts:  brain2brain2brain outline transp 2brain outline transp 2brain outline transp 2

Pages: 355   Copyright: 2014

               Lara Jean Covey is not a big fan of change. Her two sisters and her father have been comfortingly stable since her mother died, and now that her older sister Margot is going off to college in Scotland, she’s praying for some of her past to stay alive with her as she enters her junior year of high school.

                You know what they say: be careful what you wish for. Because Lara Jean’s wish comes true in a way she didn’t bargain for. She keeps five sealed unmailed letters in a hatbox in her closet: love letters to each of the boys she has loved. When she seals each letter, she says goodbye to the boy to whom it is addressed and moves on with her life. But when the letters are accidentally and mysteriously mailed, all that closure is suddenly blown wide open, and Lara Jean ends up in a strange situation with a boy from her childhood in an effort to hide the truth from a boy with an even older presence in her story.

                I’ve heard Jenny Han’s name before, but this was the first of her work that I’ve read. I really enjoyed it. In one way, none of the characters felt quite overwhelmingly realistic and breathing enough for me to lose myself in the world of the story or even to relate to them. But I did like that they had unexpected angles and that they had personalities of their own, rather than being empty vessels in which to insert people I know. At times I felt distant from Lara Jean, when she was prim or fussy in a very different way from me. But at other times, I could totally empathize with her—like when she felt pigeonholed as naïve and uptight, or when she otherwise struggled with her image.

                The thing that struck me as most refreshingly realistic about this book was the portrayal of young people’s relationships—not romantically, just in general. Lara Jean’s best friend Chris is sort of a “bad girl” who drinks alcohol, goes to crazy parties, and has lots of jaded and cynical (and perportedly experience-based) opinions about sex, but despite Lara Jean being so not like that, they’re still close, because they got to truly know each other when they were younger. Their friendship was unlike any I’ve seen really ever before in YA. Her interactions with Peter, a neighborhood friend turned popular sports guy, was similarly refreshing and evolved in really unexpected ways.

                There was something very sweet and sincere about this book. It also had strong plot flow and really kept me reading—the story never stayed too long in one place. It wasn’t a total stoundout for me, because I often felt aware that I was reading a story rather than losing myself in the world; but I’m not at all sorry that I read it, and I look forward to the resolution in the sequel next year.

                  PS: I love the cover. The model looks perfect for Lara Jean, and the title script seriously looks like they wrote it on with a Sharpie. Like, seriously. How do they do that? Look closely and you’ll see what I mean. The ink gets lighter and darker where it crosses or loops, like a marker does with varying hand pressure.

                 PPS Confession: The name Lara Jean annoys me. Sorry if any of my readers are named that. You have my permission to be annoyed by my name if you need retribution.

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